The Great Gatsby Short Sample Answers

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Table of Contents

Discuss Gatsby’s character as Nick perceives him throughout the novel. What makes Gatsby “great”? 4

What is Nick like as a narrator? Is he a reliable storyteller, or does his version of events seem suspect? How do his qualities as a character affect his narration? 5

What are some of The Great Gatsby’s most important symbols? What does the novel have to say about the role of symbols in life? 6

How does the geography of the novel dictate its themes and characters? What role does setting play in The Great Gatsby? 7

Discuss Gatsby’s character as Nick perceives him throughout the novel. What makes Gatsby “great”?

In one sense, the title of the novel is ironic; the title character is neither “great” nor named Gatsby. He is a criminal whose real name is James Gatz, and the life he has created for himself is an illusion. By the same token, the title of the novel refers to the theatrical skill with which Gatsby makes this illusion seem real: the moniker “the Great Gatsby” suggests the sort of vaudeville billing that would have been given to an acrobat, an escape artist, or a magician.

Nick is particularly taken with Gatsby and considers him a great figure. He sees both the extraordinary quality of hope that Gatsby possesses and his idealistic dream of loving Daisy in a perfect world. Though Nick recognizes Gatsby’s flaws the first time he meets him, he cannot help but admire Gatsby’s brilliant smile, his romantic idealization of Daisy, and his yearning for the future...

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