Autumn iRevise Online Tutorial Series 31st of August to 5th of December

Reading Foster, A Comparative Personal Response

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“The extent to which a reader can relate an aspect of a text to his or her experience of life, helps to shape an understanding of the general vision and viewpoint of that text.” 4

Discuss this view in relation to your study of one text on your comparative course. 4

“The extent to which a reader can relate an aspect of a text to his or her experience of life, helps to shape an understanding of the general vision and viewpoint of that text.”

Discuss this view in relation to your study of one text on your comparative course.

The fact that every person is so unique means that each reader brings their own identity, their own prejudices and perspectives, to any text they encounter. It is natural then that our view of a text is often heavily guided by our experience of life. I found this to be particularly true when it came to studying the text Foster by Claire Keegan as part of my comparative course. In this text, the general vision and viewpoint was so open to interpretation that our entire class struggled to reach any kind of consensus.

The aspect of the text that that I related to the most, and one that consequently had a huge influence on shaping my understanding of the general vision and viewpoint, was the way family life was represented in the text. Everybody has some experience of family and also some sense of the pivotal influence our home environment can have on our development, and indeed our prospects for happiness.

As a result, the cold indifference ...

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