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Robert Frost - Ordinary Subjects With Complex Interpretations

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‘In Frost’s poetry, seemingly ordinary subjects often yield complex and interesting interpretations.’ 4

To what extent do you agree with the above statement? Support your answer with reference to both the themes and language found in the poetry of Robert Frost on your course. 4

‘In Frost’s poetry, seemingly ordinary subjects often yield complex and interesting interpretations.’  

To what extent do you agree with the above statement? Support your answer with reference to both the themes and language found in the poetry of Robert Frost on your course.

For me the beauty of Robert Frost’s poetry lies in its deceiving simplicity. It is this fact that I believe explains his enduring popularity across the globe – and particularly, of course, in the nation of his birth, where he has been described as an ‘artistic institution’.

Frost was truly a poet of the people, composing verse about the everyday trials and tribulations of ordinary subjects but, crucially, in a language that could be appreciated across the social divide.

The key to Frost’s brilliance, however, is that beneath the initial accessibility of these elegantly composed lines lies many complex and intriguing perspectives. That, I believe, is the real genius of Frost – the fact that so much of his work is open to such interesting interpretations. Three poems that really capture that perspective are ‘The Road Not Taken,’ ‘Out, Out -,’ and ‘The Tuft of Flowers.’

A perfect example of an apparently ordinary po...

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