Autumn iRevise Online Tutorial Series 31st of August to 5th of December

Elizabeth Bishop - Carefully Judged Use Of Language Aids The Reader

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Table of Contents

Leaving Certificate 2013: Bishop’s carefully judged use of language aids the reader to uncover the intensity of feeling in her poetry. 4

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the above statement? Support your answer with reference to the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop on your course. 4

Leaving Certificate 2013:
Bishop’s carefully judged use of language aids the reader to uncover the intensity of feeling in her poetry.

To what extent do you agree or disagree with the above statement? Support your answer with reference to the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop on your course.

Bishop’s carefully judged use of language, one which is descriptive and vibrant, aids the reader to uncover the intensity of feeling in her poetry because it transcends time.

In ‘The Bight’, Bishop uses an array of descriptive words to convey her message: ‘Crumbling ribs of marl that protrude and glare’ is a line she uses to signify the imperfection of ‘the bight’. In this poem, Bishop seems to relate to the unconventional, unattractive ‘bight’, and she uses a number of metaphors and similes to convey the poem’s disorder – ‘like torn-open unanswered letters, the Bight is littered with old correspondences’. By using the combination of a metaphor and a simile, Bishop conjures the image of an untidy desk in our minds, then likens ‘the bight’ to it.

Subsequently, Bishop’s determination to reinforce the feeling of chaos in the poem becomes obvious in the last line: ‘Awful but cheerful’, the parado...

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