iRevise

W.B. Yeats - A Great Irish Poet - Discuss

© irevise.com 2016.

All revision notes have been produced by mockness ltd for irevise.com.

Email: info@irevise.com

Copyrighted material.

All rights reserved; no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, reprinting, or otherwise without either the prior written permission of irevise.com or a license permitting copying in the United Kingdom issued by the copyright licensing Agency.

Table of Contents

"Yeats can certainly be called a great Irish poet.” 4

Discuss this statement, supporting your answer with reference to both the themes and language found in the poetry of W. B. Yeats on your course. 4

"Yeats can certainly be called a great Irish poet.”

Discuss this statement, supporting your answer with reference to both the themes and language found in the poetry of W. B. Yeats on your course.

I certainly agree with this statement; W.B. Yeats’ work is saturated with evocative, descriptive imagery, deeply explored personal feelings, universal, but profound subject matter and strong political opinions. And he isn't just a figure of great stature in world literature; he is a patriotic poet, one who truly loved Ireland and many of its people.

I would like to explore this statement further through analysis of the following poems from my Leaving Cert English course: Lake Isle of Innisfree, The Wild Swans at Coole, Easter 1916, September 1913, An Irish Airman Foresees His Death and The Stare’s Nest by My Window.

First, there are a lot of natural images and references to nature in Yeats's poetry. These appear in poems that the reader is inclined to consider as natures poems on first glance. On closer examination and exploration of each poem’s implicit meaning, however, it is evident such references are Yeats’s poetic manner of exploring deeper complex subject matter. Lake Isle of Innisfree is one such poem full of natural images that explores a more personal them...

Sign In To View

Sign in or sign up in order to view resources on iRevise

Sign In Create An Account