Autumn iRevise Online Tutorial Series 31st of August to 5th of December

Seamus Heaney - Write A Speech To Your Classmates About Heaney's Poetry

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Write a speech to your classmates telling them how you responded to some of Heaney’s poems on your course. Support the points you make by detailed reference to the poems you choose to write about. 4

Write a speech to your classmates telling them how you responded to some of Heaney’s poems on your course. Support the points you make by detailed reference to the poems you choose to write about.

Classmates, as you know, part of our Leaving Certificate English course involved studying the poetry of Seamus Heaney. My speech today focuses on how relevant I found his poetry. Even though I am only a Leaving Cert student, I still found many of his themes and messages relevant. And despite their being written years before my time, the manner in which Heaney presented these poems only furthered this relevance.

We see this through the poet’s focus on memory, the political and social perspectives of his poetry, his use of vivid and detailed imagery, as well as his style; all of which and more I will discuss in poems such as ‘A Constable Calls’, ‘The Underground’, ‘A Call’, ‘The Tollund Man’, ‘Lightenings viii’, and ‘The Forge’.

The first way in which I found Heaney’s poetry accessible and relevant was through his focus on memory. Heaney focuses on memory, many examples of which are extremely relevant for me. He delves into the issue of Northern Ireland’s troubled past, something the majority of our class is aware of, having studied it and grown up in its aftermath. ...

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