Feelings Evoked By Eliot's Poetry

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Table of Contents

2005: 4

Write about the feelings that T.S. Eliot’s poetry creates in you and the aspects of his poetry (content and/or style) that help to create those feelings. 4

Support your points by reference to the poetry by T.S. Eliot that you have read. 4

2005:

Write about the feelings that T.S. Eliot’s poetry creates in you and the aspects of his poetry (content and/or style) that help to create those feelings.

Support your points by reference to the poetry by T.S. Eliot that you have read.

One of the main feelings T.S. Eliot’s poetry creates in me is a strong sense of his pessimism and disillusionment with the society he found himself within. He expresses this most directly, I believe, in his poem, ‘Preludes’, the very title of which is a suggestion that the events this poem portrays serve as an introduction to something more important: in this case, the collapse of society as Eliot knows it in favour of modern living and the rat race.

In this poem, the world Eliot portrays is one of darkness and loneliness, one illuminated only by small and fading sources of hope: ‘And then the lighting of the lamps’. However, this hopeful interlude comes very early in the poem (stanza 2), and it is stamped out by what follows it, by the ‘faint stale smells of beer’, ‘the sawdust-trampled street’, and the ‘dingy shades’ this world’s less fortunate people, the servants of the wealthy, must work behind.

In a manner that is both poignant and startling, Eliot describes this world as on...

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