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Comparative Sample Answer – Foster, Death of a Superhero, and A Doll’s House

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“A reader’s understanding of the general vision and viewpoint is influenced by key moments in the text.” 4

(a) Choose a key moment from one of your chosen texts and show how it influenced your understanding of the general vision and viewpoint. (30) 4

(b) With reference to two other chosen texts compare the way in which key moments influence your understanding of the general vision and viewpoint of those texts. (40) 5

“A reader’s understanding of the general vision and viewpoint is influenced by key moments in the text.”

(a) Choose a key moment from one of your chosen texts and show how it influenced your understanding of the general vision and viewpoint. (30)

 

The texts that I studied as part of my comparative course were Foster by Claire Keegan, Death of a Superhero (DOAS) directed by Ian Fitzgibbon, and A Doll’s House (ADH) by Henrik Ibsen.

 

There is little doubt that when a reader is coming to an understanding of the general vision and viewpoint in a text, key moments are particularly influential in helping to highlight certain crucial aspects.

In ADH, a key moment that really helped me to understand the general vision and viewpoint came towards the end of the play. This occurs when Nora has discovered Nora’s ‘crime’ from Krogstad’s letter, and his response is sudden and brutal. He calls her a ‘wretched woman’, a ‘liar’ and, most ironically of all, a ‘hypocrite.’

This man, who has spent most of the play professing his undying love for her, now tells her th...

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