Autumn iRevise Online Tutorial Series 31st of August to 5th of December

Comparative Sample Answer 2 – Foster, Death of a Superhero, and A Doll’s House

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“The general vision and viewpoint is shaped by the reader’s feeling of optimism or pessimism in reading the text.” 4

In light of the above statement, compare the general vision and viewpoint in at least two texts you have studied in your comparative course. (70) 4

“The general vision and viewpoint is shaped by the reader’s feeling of optimism or pessimism in reading the text.”

In light of the above statement, compare the general vision and viewpoint in at least two texts you have studied in your comparative course. (70)

 

The general vision and viewpoint is hugely influential in how we view a particular text. Through the plot, the central characters and how their lives unravel; as well as the manner in which the author decides to present the text, we are left with varying degrees of optimism or pessimism, light and dark.

This naturally has a huge effect on both our enjoyment of the text, as well as how our personal reactions to the texts are shaped. For me, I have come from a point of being completely ignorant of the true meaning of the term general vision and viewpoint, to a position of realising the huge role it has in my comprehension of a particular text. Naturally, the overall general vision and viewpoint is intrinsically linked to the feeling we get from reading the text.

In the case of the three texts on the course that I studied, this is particularly true. Foster written by Claire Keegan, Death of a Superhero directed by Ian Fitzgibbon, and A Doll’s...

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