Persepolis - Changing Lifestyles in Persepolis

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Changing Lifestyles in Persepolis 4

Changing Lifestyles in Persepolis

It is hard to understand and obey any law forcing individuals to change their way of living. In the book Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, there were many changes in the way of living during the revolution. Persepolis was written based on Satrapi’s childhood memories. Satrapi explains the difficulties she had in changing her usual ways and getting in trouble for expressing herself through the things she liked. It was not just Satrapi who faced changes but other families as well, even the society as a whole; a great impact on the military, women, education and in many adolescent lives.

To begin with, the military began recruiting teenage boys aged fourteen living in poverty, something that effected a created a change in the military. At fourteen, one is still considered immature and has not mentally or physically developed to the fullest. To join the military one should be mature and fully grown. In addition, many of these fourteen-year-old boys were tricked into joining; they were given a key painted gold representing value. They were told if they were fortunate enough to die, the golden key would open the door into heaven, and promised a better life than the one they were living in the lower class.

As Mrs. Nasrine, Satrapi’s maid, explains, “They told him that in paradise there will be plenty of food, women and houses made of gold and diamonds.”

The lifestyles of these teenage boys were c...

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