Adrienne Rich, Themes

© irevise.com 2018.

All revision notes have been produced by mockness ltd for irevise.com.

Email: info@irevise.com

Copyrighted material.

All rights reserved; no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, reprinting, or otherwise without either the prior written permission of irevise.com or a license permitting copying in the United Kingdom issued by the copyright licensing Agency.

Table of Contents

Important themes in Rich’s poetry 4

Important themes in Rich’s poetry

Relationships

Rich is perhaps best known as a feminist writer and many of her poems deal with the oppression of women by men. Marriage, in particular, is seen as a tool by which women are kept under men’s thumb. ‘From a Survivor’ emphasises how women can be mastered or controlled by their husbands. The speaker suggests that her husband’s body was ‘the body of a God’ and that it had ‘power’ over her life.

Similarly, in ‘Trying to Talk to a Man’, the speaker again suggests that her husband might have dominated her life: ‘Your dry heat feels like power / your eyes are stars of a different magnitude’. ‘Living in Sin’, too, touches on this topic, although here the couple are simply living together.

However, here it is the woman in the relationship who does all the work, who makes the bed and tidies the apartment: she ‘pulled back the sheets and made the bed and found / a towel to dust the tabletop’. The man with whom she lives, meanwhile, seems to contribute little to the upkeep of the household. This can be taken as yet another instance, therefore, of a woman being dominated or controlled by man. It is another poem in which Rich emphasises the fundamental inequality of marriage and of relationships between men and women.

‘The Roofwalker’ can be interpreted as a further poem that presents marriage in a negative light. In this poem the speaker realises her marriage has been a terrible mista...

Sign In To View

Sign in or sign up in order to view resources on iRevise

Sign In Create An Account