WB Yeats' Poetry, Essential Revision Notes

© irevise.com 2017.

All revision notes have been produced by mockness ltd for irevise.com.

Table of Contents

Context 4

‘He Wishes For The Cloths Of Heaven’ 5

Summary 6

Annotation 7

‘The Lake Isle of Innisfree’ 8

Summary 9

Annotation 10

‘The Wild Swans at Coole’ 11

Summary 12

Annotation 13

Context

William Butler Yeats (1865-1939) was born in Dublin. His father was a lawyer and a well-known portrait painter. Yeats was educated in London and in Dublin, but he spent his summers in the west of Ireland in the family's summer house in Sligo. The young Yeats was very much part of the fin de siècle in London; at the same time he was active in societies that attempted an Irish literary revival.

Yeats’ first volume of verse appeared in 1887, but in his earlier period his dramatic production outweighed his poetry both in bulk and in import. Together with Lady Gregory he founded the Irish Theatre, which was to become the Abbey Theatre, and served as its chief playwright until the movement was joined by John Synge. His plays usually treated Irish legends; they also reflected his fascination with mysticism and spiritualism. The Countess Cathleen (1892), The Land of Heart's Desire (1894), Cathleen Ni Houlihan (1902), The King's Threshold (1904), and Deirdre (1907) are among his best known.

After 1910, Yeats' dramatic art took a sharp turn toward a highly poetical, static, and esoteric style. His later plays were written for small audiences; they experiment with masks, dance, and music, and were profoundly influenced by the Japanese Noh plays. Although a convinced patriot, Yeats deplored the hatred and the bigotry of the Nationalist movement, and his poetry is full of moving protests against it. He was appointed to the Irish Senate in 1922.

WB Yeats is one of the few writers whose greatest works were written after the award of the Nobel Prize, which he received in 1923. Whereas he received the prize chiefly for his dramatic works, his significance today rests on his lyric achievement. His poetry,...

Sign In To View

Sign in or sign up in order to view resources on iRevise

Sign In Create An Account